One CT article titled “Hunger Isn’t History” ponders through reasons why hunger is still a huge problem, why 25,000 are still dying despite global efforts to solve. It’s the big ‘globalization’ factor, along with the massive growth and increased consumption:

On the road toward fulfilling the Bono-endorsed slogan, “Make Poverty History,” the world has hit an unexpected speed bump: prosperity. India’s expanding auto industry puts 4,300 new cars a day on already-crowded streets. Oil-wealthy Russia has doubled its meat consumption since 2000. Brazil’s sizzling economy is growing its use of steel at a faster rate (over 20 percent this year alone) than nearly any other nation. China has increased its consumption of eggs by a factor of ten in recent years.

Experts are citing these reasons for the 850 million going “chronically hungry”:

  • Failed harvests. Since 2006, multi-year drought, cyclones, and other natural disasters have dramatically cut harvests in some food-exporting nations. A six-year drought in Australia’s rice-growing region, for example, has caused its harvest to plummet.
  • Rising fuel prices. Demand for new oil and gas sources has triggered price spikes, thus increasing the cost of food production. Despite a recent decline from the $147-per-barrel peak this July, oil prices are still 60 percent higher than they were in 2005.
  • Increased demand for grain. About 100 million tons of grains and oilseeds are being diverted to produce biofuels every year. China and other developing nations are annually using millions of tons more of imported corn, wheat, and soybeans to feed cattle, pigs, and chickens.
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